Instant ID-Card

Instant ID Card

Instant ID Card made from a Instant PVC, with 0.76mm thickness, usually use for employee identity card at corporate, identity card for student and many more. Easy to made just need computer with graphic software, inkjet printer, laminate machine, id card pond machine and of course the material for instant id card.

Forum Percetakan | The Offset Printing




The Offset Printing
Offset printing is the most commonly used printing method today. More than 50% of all printing jobs is using offset printing technique.
Offset printing works with a simple manner. Offset printing uses three cylinder to transfer the printed image to the substrate. First cylinder in offset printing is mounted with offset printing plate. The image on offset printing plate is readable. The first cylinder inked and transfer image onto the rubber blanket (second cylinder). The image in rubber blanket is unreadable. After that image transferred from rubber blanket onto third cylinder or the substrate. Substrate is mounted on the third cylinder or The Impression Cylinder. The image in Impression Cylinder becomes readable again.
Image in offset printing have a unique characteristic, the printed image and non-printed image are on same surface level. The printing method used a chemical process that ink and water not mixed from a single surface level. In fact, offset printing acquired this method from lithography and thus it is often referred to as litho offset printing as well.
The types of offset printing press.
Offset printing have two types. 1. Web-fed offset printing press. This kind offset printing press the printing carried out on a single continous sheet of paper feed from a huge roll paper. The sheet then cut into individual sheet of desired sizes, depend on the order of offset printing. 2. Sheet-fed offset printing press. In this kind offset printing press the printing carried out on single sheet paper as they fed to the press one at a time.
The offset printing process.
The offset printing processs requires a fairly large investment in equipment and set up. But, once infrastructure is in place, offset printing is inexpensive. Many things to know about offset printing process from creating the artwork for offset printing to the operating the offset printing machine press and binding.
Application of offset printing
Offset printing invades every aspect of our lives from influencing education through the printing of books and other reading material to the packaging industry by creative printing of packages for consumer goods. The many application of offset printing would be difficult to put down but suffice to say that the world would be a much less fun place to live in without offset printing. For example, you never read magazine or newspaper, if offset printing industry never been founded. Thus, offset printing is the printing technique that has made magazine possible, books affordable and marketing and promotion for many industry.

Screen Printing Technique

Screen Printing Technique
A screen is made of a piece of porous, finely woven fabric called mesh stretched over a frame of aluminum or wood. Originally human hair then silk was woven into screen mesh; currently most mesh is made of man-made materials such as steel, nylon, and polyester. Areas of the screen are blocked off with a non-permeable material to form a stencil, which is a negative of the image to be printed; that is, the open spaces are where the ink will appear.
The screen is placed atop a substrate such as paper or fabric. Ink is placed on top of the screen, and a fill bar (also known as a floodbar) is used to fill the mesh openings with ink. The operator begins with the fill bar at the rear of the screen and behind a reservoir of ink. The operator lifts the screen to prevent contact with the substrate and then using a slight amount of downward force pulls the fill bar to the front of the screen. This effectively fills the mesh openings with ink and moves the ink reservoir to the front of the screen. The operator then uses a squeegee (rubber blade) to move the mesh down to the substrate and pushes the squeegee to the rear of the screen. The ink that is in the mesh opening is pumped or squeezed by capillary action to the substrate in a controlled and prescribed amount, i.e. the wet ink deposit is equal to the thickness of the mesh and or stencil. As the squeegee moves toward the rear of the screen the tension of the mesh pulls the mesh up away from the substrate (called snap-off) leaving the ink upon the substrate surface.
There are three types of screenprinting presses. The 'flat-bed' (probably the most widely used), 'cylinder', and 'rotary'.
Textile items are printed in multi-color designs using a wet on wet technique, while graphic items are allowed to dry between colors that are then printed with another screen and often in a different color.
The screen can be re-used after cleaning. However if the design is no longer needed, then the screen can be "reclaimed", that is cleared of all emulsion and used again. The reclaiming process involves removing the ink from the screen then spraying on stencil remover to remove all emulsion. Stencil removers come in the form of liquids, gels, or powders. The powdered types have to be mixed with water before use, and so can be considered to belong to the liquid category. After applying the stencil remover the emulsion must be washed out using a pressure washer.
Most screens are ready for recoating at this stage, but sometimes screens will have to undergo a further step in the reclaiming process called dehazing. This additional step removes haze or "ghost images" left behind in the screen once the emulsion has been removed. Ghost images tend to faintly outline the open areas of previous stencils, hence the name. They are the result of ink residue trapped in the mesh, often in the knuckles of the mesh, those points where threads overlap.
While the public thinks of garments in conjunction with screenprinting, the technique is used on tens of thousands of items, decals, clock and watch faces, balloons and many more products. The technique has even been adapted for more advanced uses, such as laying down conductors and resistors in multi-layer circuits using thin ceramic layers as the substrate.


Screen Printing (Sablon)

Screen Printing
Screen printing (sablon) is a printing technique that uses a woven mesh (screen) to support an ink-blocking stencil. The attached stencil forms open areas of mesh that transfer ink as a sharp-edged image onto a substrate. A roller or squeegee is moved across the screen stencil, forcing or pumping ink past the threads of the woven mesh in the open areas.



Search Result


Variable Laser Image

Variable Laser Image
Laser engraved image with tilting effect incorporated in plastic cards: images are engraved at different angles through an array of cylindrical lenses embossed into the surface of the card. The image that can be seen changes depending on the angle of view.







Source : Click Here

Watermark

Watermark
A picture, text or character motif, which is incorporated into the paper during manufacture by displacement of the paper fibres, leading to a varying thickness of the paper. The watermark can be observed using transmitted light. Where the paper is thinner, we can see more light and a clearer image. Where the paper is thicker we will see a darker image. The watermark should not appear under UV light.








Source : Click Here

Unique Character

Unique Character
Not one of the standard fonts or typefaces.






Source : Click Here

UV Light (UltraViolet Light)

UV Light (UltraViolet Light)
Belongs to the electromagnetic waves at the lower boundary of visible light (200 - 400 nm). A source of light that is frequently used in document examination to analyse paper brightness, fluorescent inks and other security features as well as tampering. The main UV sources used in document examination are UV sources with 365/366 nm (long-wave UV), 313 nm (medium wave UV) and 254 nm (short-wave UV) wavelength radiation. Ultraviolet "light" is not visible itself, only its effect, i.e. the visible fluorescence stimulated by UV light can be seen ( fluorescent ink, etc.).







Source : Click Here

Titling Effect

Titling Effect
An image (or characters) which can be seen or which changes when the document is tilted.





Source : Click Here

Transmitted Light

Transmitted Light
Light shining through the object being viewed (here: page of document). In practice, the object to be viewed is placed between the eye (or camera) and the light source.






Source : Click Here

Thermochromic Ink

Thermochromic Ink
Special ink that changes colour in a reversible way at different temperatures.







Source : Click Here

Thermal Transfer Printing

Thermal Transfer Printing
Printing takes place by applying heat to a heat-sensitive ribbon containing wax- or resin-based ink. The coloured ink ribbon is heated over a certain area, and the melted ink is then fully transferred from the ribbon on to the substrate. Depending on the heating process the size of the transferred area of ink can be varied. Halftones are generated by rasterisation (screening). The transfer of a homogeneous layer of colour leads to dots or areas with sharp edges. Special ink ribbons, e.g. with metallic pigments, can also be used. Thermal transfer printing is a possible integration technique for biodata / photo / signature integration.







Source : Click Here

Tank Tracking - Perforation

sTank Tracking - Perforation
A method of securing a conventionally fixed (e.g. glued) image of the holder (authentication), applied with a (hand) press in the form of a pattern of lines; between the lines there are often perforated holes.






Source : Click Here

Thermal Dye Sublimation

Thermal Dye Sublimation
Like thermal transfer printers, sublimation printers use an ink ribbon. The dye on the foil is heated to a specific temperature at which it evaporates and then diffuses into the substrate. For that diffusion process a specially coated substrate is necessary. Depending on the temperature applied, a varying amount of dye is diffused into the substrate. This facilitates the production of an image with continuous tone colours. Thermal dye sublimation is a possible integration technique for biodata / photo / signature integration.






Source : Click Here

Synthetic Fibres

Synthetic Fibres
Synthetic fibres are used as a main component in some special papers; they make the paper highly durable and resistant (example: old (pink, folded) German driving licence). Not to be confused with coloured fibres, which do not contribute to the mechanical properties of a paper.





Source : Click Here

Serial Number

Serial Number
A unique sequential number that is printed or perforated in a document and assigned for identification; this uniqueness allows a document to be traced if it is lost or stolen.






Source : Click Here

Substrate Without Optical Brightener

Substrate Without Optical Brightener
Security paper (e.g. passport paper): Does not contain optical brighteners and thus remains dark under UV light. The use of paper substrate with optical brighteners in passports is, however, also possible (but they are not used very often): Optical brighteners are substances which are incorporated during manufacture into the paper pulp (which consists mainly of wood fibres), in order to make the paper appear whiter. The presence of optical brighteners can be detected by their bluish fluorescence under UV light.







Source : Click Here

Security Thread

Security Thread
A strip (plastic, metallic, or other material) incorporated in the substrate during manufacture to serve as an additional security feature. A broad range of security threads exists, from polymer to metal-coated, coloured and micro-printed laminate strips, to highly complex threads, which possess machine-readable properties.








Source : Click Here

See-trough Register

See-trough Register
Images in accurate front-to-back register. Designs or partial motifs seemingly printed at random on the front and back of the substrate, but which match up perfectly or form a complete motif when viewed by transmitted light. Imperfect register in counterfeits will produce a blurred image when viewed by transmitted light.






Source : Click Here

Secondary (Ghost) Image

Secondary (Ghost) Image
Second facial image of the document holder included in identity documents. Secondary (ghost or shadow) images can be applied by the same printing process as the primary facial image or by different processes, e.g. using: fluorescent overprint, ,laser perforation, Identigram®






Source : Click Here

Screen Printing

Screen Printing
A printing technique also known as silk-screen printing in which the print is produced by the ink being pressed with a so-called doctor blade through the permeable areas of a screen (mesh) on to the substrate below. Screen printing enables a thicker layer of ink to be applied in one operation than any other printing process. Characteristics: Generally dense covering of ink, thick layer; net structure with saw-tooth edges. In security printing, screen printing is mainly used for laminate overprints or printing of OVI.





Source : Click Here

Scrambled(Encrypted) Image

Scrambled(Encrypted) Image
By means of special software tools : individual information such as the passport number, or the holder's name, is embedded in the photograph of the holder or static information such as a country’s name, is embedded in the background printing of travel documents. This information is invisible to the human eye, as it is printed in "scrambled" format and can only be seen using a decoder lens (a special viewer) or laboratory equipment (scanner or camera with a computer with image processing software). Not to be confused with latent image, nor with tilting effect.





Source : Click Here

Schablon (stencil) Multiple Colouring Process

Schablon (stencil) Multiple Colouring Process
This colouring process - sometimes also referred to as Orlof (Orlov) process - is used in intaglio printing and enables more than one colour to be printed simultaneously and accurately with one printing plate. A modern printing press can often print several colours (e.g. 3, 4, or 5). The individual colours are applied via individual stencils that match the elements or parts of the required final design. These stencils are also referred to as schablons (or chablons). The inks may overlap to a small extent and in the final printed image a slight colour transition can therefore be seen. The colour transitions need not, as in rainbow colouring (offset printing), run parallel to the direction of printing.








Source : Click Here

Retroreflective Laminate

Retroreflective Laminate
An invisible image is incorporated into the laminate and rendered visible by the use of co-axial light using a special viewer.






Source : Click Here

Relief Embossing

Relief Embossing
Also sometimes called blind embossing: colourless embossing of images or text. Relief or blind embossing involves high-pressure embossing of letters, motifs or other designs.






Source : Click Here

PVC (Polyvinylchloride)

PVC (Polyvinylchloride)
A widely used thermoplastic (transparent) polymer. In a lot of documents PVC is used as substrate. PC (polycarbonate) is often preferred for security printing and for documents for which a higher durability is needed (longer validity periods).





Source : Click Here

Rainbow Colouring

Rainbow Colouring
Also called split duct printing. This colouring process used in offset printing is used to protect security documents against colour separation or copying, by subtly merging colours into each other resulting in a gradual colour change.






Source : Click Here

Pre-printed Text

Pre-printed Text
Text printed in a document on top of the security or background printing.






Source : Click Here

Photographic Process

Photographic Process
Procedures by which light-sensitive materials are made to produce an image on photographic paper. A photographic process is a possible integration technique for biodata / photo / signature integration.






Source : Click Here

Planchettes

Planchettes
Small coloured discs incorporated (or scattered) in the paper during manufacture. Planchettes are incorporated in a similar way to coloured fibres. Planchettes can also be metallic or transparent; they may also fluoresce under UV light, or be made of an iridescent substance showing colour shifts.






Source : Click Here

Photographic Paper

Photographic Paper
Paper coated with light-sensitive chemicals. (Not to be confused with specially coated printing papers for high-quality inkjet or laser printing (digital photographic) processes, which in everyday language are also referred to as photographic papers.)





Source : Click Here

Photochromic Ink

Photochromic Ink
Photochromic inks change their colour when exposed to UV light. When the UV light source is removed, the colour change stays for a certain time before the colour reverts to its original state. Examples: Estonia: passport, Malta: passport (since November 2000).







Source : Click Here

Photograph of The Holder - Fixing Methods

Photograph of The Holder - Fixing Methods
Photo Patch
Fixing method for conventional photos.



Glued
Fixing method for conventional photos.



Eyelets (rivets)
Fixing method for conventional photos.



Stapled





Source : Click Here

PC (Polycarbonate)

PC (Polycarbonate)
Polycarbonate (PC) is a thermoplastic polymer with excellent toughness characteristics. When used as a substrate for documents (biodata pages or cards), a composition of several layers is fused at high temperature. With PC as a substrate for security documents, a wide range of special security features can be integrated, e.g. personalization by laser engraving, laser perforated secondary (ghost) images and variable laser images.





Source : Click Here

Phosphorescent Ink

Phosphorescent Ink
Ink containing components which emit light after exposure to light of a specific wavelength (normal light or UV light). In phosphorescent materials the emission of light continues after cessation of the stimulated radiation (from 10-8 seconds to several seconds or hours) whereas fluorescence is a very short-lived emission which ceases within 10-8 seconds (fluorescent ink).






Source : Click Here

OVI (Optically Variable Ink)



OVI (Optically Variable Ink)
Printing ink containing optically variable pigments which show large colour shifts (strong variations in colour) depending on the angle of observation or lighting. Optically variable inks consist of multi-layered micro flakes in a transparent ink medium. The pigment flakes are microscopic waveband-selecting optical devices (interference filters). OVIs are used in intaglio printing or in screen printing.








Source : Click Here

Optical Stripe

Optical Stripe
A laser-readable memory device with a relatively large storage capacity (up to 4 MB). Multiple data files including high resolution images can be stored; also visual features, like a micro image, security patterns and an OVD (Optically Variable Device) can be viewed for rapid card authentication.






Source : Click Here

Numbering

Numbering
To indicate within the descriptive text the composition of the serial number, the following alphanumeric characters are generally used: A: any letter, N: any digit: e.g. <> , <> or
<>. Other letters are normally only used if the same letter is actually printed on each document of the same series (version) - then it is put between quotation marks: e.g.: < "Nr EE" NNNNNN >:






Source : Click Here

Oblique Light

Oblique Light
Light from the side, falling at a shallow angle, which reveals the surface structure of an object through contrasts of light and shade. Oblique light is used especially to inspect embossing stamps, intaglio printing, latent images and mechanical erasures.






Source : Click Here

Offset Printing

Offset Printing
Offset is an indirect printing process in which text or image are transferred on to a cylinder covered with a rubber blanket and from there printed to the substrate. Offset printing relies on the principle of mutual repulsion of water and fat; characterized by even inking and precise edge limits. The printing and non-printing areas lie in the same plane of the printing plate. In security printing, another indirect printing process, indirect letterpress (sometimes also called dry offset) printing is widely used. Here the text or image is transferred from a letterpress printing plate to the rubber blanket. The result is very similar to “wet offset” (the characteristic features of letterpress printing are not always to be seen).







Source : Click Here

group of moonkeee projects