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Lenticular printing

Lenticular printing made simple: in simplest terms, lenticular printing combines photography with lithography using two or more images "interlaced" on a camera lens. Offsetting series of images, lenticular artists can create the illusion of motion, the appearance of depth, or a process through which one picture seems to morph into another.

Although apprentices can master the process, any viewer can discern the difference between a beginner's and a master artisan's work, because the master's images are far sharper, more defined, and more completely resolved than a novice. Working with experienced professionals; you are assured of the industry's highest quality lenticular prints.

What can lenticular printing do for you?

You can use lenticular images almost anywhere you would use traditional printing, so that everything from business cards to aisle and end cap signage becomes more effective when it animates in your hand or as you walk by it. Gain impact at the point of sale with lenticular price cards or imprint your brand with buttons, key rings, magnets, and mouse pads. Lining your sidewalls and backdrop with lenticular posters, add life to your booths at exhibitions and trade shows.

Advertisers begin using lenticular process.

Tracing its deepest roots to the 1940s and 1950s, lenticular technology and lenticular printing created CrackerJack prizes and a wide variety of novelty items that seemed to move-winking eyes, smiling faces, and pictures changing from cheery to creepy. Lenticular technology brought advertising into the future by introducing the static billboards that gave the illusion of action sequences. Examples in lenticular advertising began popping up in the mid 1990s with freeway billboards that seem "to follow" motorists as they passed or that changed or altered as viewing angles changed.

Why not add visual interest to your upcoming promotional campaign with lenticular printing? Because technological advances have made lenticular printing easier and more affordable, you now can add depth or motion to your advertising in a manner never before available in short runs. These print promotional products are appealing to your customers' insatiable appetite for all things 3D. In fact, the latest lenticular technology allows you to create short "videos" or stereoscopic images on a variety of products.

Source : Lenticular Printing - ezinearticles.com/?Lenticular-Printing&id=5893834

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